Monday, November 27, 2006

Maroon Arts: Cultural Vitality in the African Diaspora


Maroon Arts: Cultural Vitality in the African Diaspora
by Sally Price, Richard Price
Synopsis

A stunning record of African-American history and culture through anthropological and artistic eyes - Sally and Richard Price`s groundbreaking work put the history back into the art history of the African diaspora, carefully documenting three centuries of struggle, debate, imitation, and innovation in one of the world`s most beautiful artistic traditions. - J. Lorand Matory, professor of Afro-American Studies and Anthropology, Harvard University - Lavishly illustrated with more than 300 images - Will appeal to art lovers, historians, those interested in museum studies, African American history and culture, and collectors of African Art


From the Publisher

Advance Praise for Maroon Arts

Sally and Richard Price`s groundbreaking work puts the history back into the art history of the African Diaspora, carefully decumenting three centuries of struggle, debate, imitation, and innovation in one of the world`s most beautiful artistic traditions. --J. Lorand Matory, professor of Afro-American studies and anthropology, Harvard University

Maroon Arts is a tribute to the continued power of ethnography and careful attention to the people who are anthropology`s subjects. This is a true marriage of anthropology and art history, and there is nothing in the anthropology of art yet like this kind of placement of expression in sociohistorical context. --Fred Myers, chair, department of anthropology, New York University

Another marvelous achievement by the Prices. Building upon years of intimate contact with the Saramaka, they have produced a work that is at once informative, sympathetic, insightful, and richly illustrated. It is a major contribution to our understanding of the cultural systems of the African Diaspora. --Colin Palmer, distinguished professor of history, The Graduate School, City University of New York

The Maroon peoples of Suriname are decended from slaves imported from West and Central Africa who escaped from Dutch plantations in the 18th century. Their art is a rich mix of African American aesthetics and the strong spirit of individual creativity. The authors who share the Dittman Chair in American Studies at the College of William and Mary examine textiles, woodcarving, calabash decorations, and ritual performance with an anthropologist`s regard for historical and cultural context. . . . An important contribution to the literature of anthropolgy and art. --Library Journal --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.